Blooms for Bees

Blooms for Bees

UK bumblebee species guide

Filter bee species by tail or body colour:

Common bumblebees

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Buff-tailed bumblebee

The Buff-tailed Bumblebee is one of the most common UK bumblebees, and the large queens are often the first to ...
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White-tailed Bumblebee

Widespread throughout the majority of the UK. This species often goes through two generations in a season, but is not ...
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Garden Bumblebee

Common throughout the UK, found in gardens but also other habitats. Distinguishable from other common black and yellow banded species ...
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Red-tailed Bumblebee

Common throughout the UK, apart from the far north. Has a distinctive velvety black body and dark orange, almost crimson ...
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Early Bumblebee

A small bumblebee of fluffy appearance, found throughout much of the UK, although absent from the Western and Northern Isles ...
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Common Carder Bee

The only common UK bumblebee that is mostly brown/ginger, but lacks a white tail. Widely distributed and the most common ...
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Tree Bumblebee

A relatively recent arrival to the UK from mainland Europe. First recorded in Wiltshire in 2001, the Tree Bumblebee is ...
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Heath Bumblebee

Widespread across most of the UK, although fairly scarce in eastern England. Superficially similar to the Garden Bumblebee, but prefers ...
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Cuckoo bumblebees

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Red-tailed Cuckoo Bee

A large bumblebee with very dark wings, a strong build and boxy head. Relatively widespread in England, but less common ...
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Southern Cuckoo Bee

One of the most common and widespread cuckoo bees, particularly in the south of England.
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Field Cuckoo Bee

Declining, but still fairly common in most of England and Wales. Much scarcer in Scotland and Ireland.
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Forest Cuckoo Bee

Common throughout much of the UK, although scarce in Ireland. Strongly associated with woodland, but can be found in other ...
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Gypsy Cuckoo Bee

Present in pockets throughout England and Wales, but declining in these areas. More abundant in the north of Scotland and ...
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Barbut’s Cuckoo Bee

Fairly widespread in southern and central England, but thought to be declining significantly in some areas. More scarce in Wales, ...
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Scarce bumblebees

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Bilberry Bumblebee

A distinctive bee with an abdomen that is almost completely bright orange. Found predominantly in heath and moorland habitats, normally ...
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Broken-belted Bumblebee

Found in few places other than Northern Scotland, Salisbury Plain and South Wales. Resembles the White-tailed Bumblebee, though emerges much ...
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Brown-banded Carder Bee

Once present throughout much of England and Wales, the Brown-banded Carder Bee has retreated southwards to localities such as the ...
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Moss Carder Bee

Once widespread throughout the UK, this species underwent significant decline in the twentieth century and is now mostly found in ...
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Shrill Carder Bee

Once present in many parts of England, Wales and Southern Scotland, the Shrill Carder Bee suffered drastic declines during the ...
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Red-shanked Carder Bee

The range of this species has reduced substantially in recent years. Although similar in appearance to the more common Red-tailed ...
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Ruderal Bumblebee

A large bee, similar to the Garden Bumblebee, but appears later in the year and is less likely to be ...
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Great Yellow Bumblebee

Once present in much of the UK, this is one of our most declined bumblebees. Now confined to the far ...
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Northern White-tailed Bumblebee

The Northern White-tailed Bumblebee is very similar to the White-tailed Bumblebee, but appears to primarily inhabit upland areas. There are ...
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Cryptic Bumblebee

Although first scientifically described in 1775, the Cryptic Bumblebee was only recently confirmed as a distinct species following DNA studies. ...
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Short-haired Bumblebee

Last seen in 1988 and declared extinct in the UK in 2000, but subject to a reintroduction project in Kent. ...
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